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benlisquare

Changing the thermal paste on the ASUS G75VW: A disassembly/reassembly adventure

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Super Tester
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Not that long ago, I made this post which reported on the extremely high GPU temperatures that I was getting while playing World of Warships, specifically in regards to the main port screen. At the time, my GPU became as hot as 86 degrees Celsius at the port screen, and 81 degrees Celsius while in battle. Fearing that one day the silicon components of my computer would melt or burn up in flames, I decided that it was about time that I replaced the thermal paste for the CPU and GPU. And so, I purchased a tube of Arctic Silver 5 thermal paste, and began to disassemble my laptop.

 

Disassembly

 

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Removal of the keyboard panel, after removing the screws behind the back plate holding it in place.

 

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Removal of the LCD screen, giving access to the screws needed to remove the motherboard.

 

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Removal of the motherboard from the laptop unit.

 

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Motherboard of the ASUS G75VW, with CPU and graphics card heat sinks attached. Note the buildup of dust, over the span of 3 years.

 

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Other side of the motherboard, showing where the CPU and graphics card heatsinks attach on to the motherboard, and the location of the screws.

 

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The disassembled keyboard panel (left) and LCD screen (right).

 

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Miscellaneous parts disassembled from the laptop (optical drive, HDD, SSD, fan covers, etc.)

 

 

Edited by benlisquare

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Super Tester
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Pasting

 

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Motherboard with the CPU and graphics card heatsinks removed, showing the old thermal paste underneath, which is no longer capable of managing heat and needs replacing.

 

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Motherboard after cleaning the old thermal paste using methylated spirits. I've also cleaned the heatsinks as well, just not in this image.

 

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GPU on the ASUS G75VW, which is a nVidia GeForce GTX 660M. The graphics card on the G75VW is replaceable and uses your usual PCI-E, but there's no point since nobody sells individual graphics cards in such a form factor to begin with.

 

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Fully cleaned CPU (Intel Core i7 3610QM), and the tube of new thermal paste to be applied (Arctic Silver 5).

 

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New thermal paste added to the GPU.

 

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New thermal paste added to the CPU.

 

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GPU heatsink reattached to the motherboard after repasting; the CPU has also been repasted but is still bare.

 

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CPU heatsink reattached after repasting.

 

 

Edited by benlisquare

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Super Tester
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Reassembly

 

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First POST->CMOS test to ensure that everything is working correctly. (Currently no bootable drives are attached, and only two out of four RAM sticks are installed because of positioning)

 

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Putting everything together afterwards is a huge pain, and is much more tedious than taking everything apart. Those damn keyboard cables, man.

 

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Mostly done, good enough for another test boot, this time to operating system.

 

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All complete.

 

Results

 

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Old GPU temperatures before re-pasting, at heavy load. The first curve shows the temperature while running World of Warships and playing a battle; the second curve shows the temperature whilst sitting idle in the port screen.

 

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New GPU temperatures after re-pasting, whilst sitting idle in the port screen.

 

Overall, I'm very satisfied with the results of the repasting of my laptop CPU and GPU. GPU temps went from 86 degrees Celsius to 57 degrees Celsius under heavy load, and from 47 degrees to 32 degrees when the system is idle and sitting at the Windows desktop.

 

Edited by benlisquare

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Super Tester
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W-whoa, that's a whole 30 degrees of difference right there :v

 

The magic of actually using quality thermal paste, instead of the default OEM paste that laptop manufacturers use.

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Moderator
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What does the paste do, exactly?

And you just apply it straight onto the CPU?

 

Thermal paste basically fills in gaps and ensures heat is quickly conducted directly from CPUs/GPUs into the heat sinks, where they can be dissipated more efficiently. Air is an excellent insulator, after all - and gaps between the CPU and heat sink will result in less adequate conducting at best, or a melted CPU at worst.

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Beta Tester
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Thermal paste basically fills in gaps and ensures heat is quickly conducted directly from CPUs/GPUs into the heat sinks, where they can be dissipated more efficiently. Air is an excellent insulator, after all - and gaps between the CPU and heat sink will result in less adequate conducting at best, or a melted CPU at worst.

 

Thanks :)

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Beta Tester
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What does the paste do, exactly?

And you just apply it straight onto the CPU?

 

A-also just to make it clear you apply it on TOP of the CPU. Yes.

T-totally not speaking from experience of someone who put it on the contacts. Nope. Not at all.

 

My friend (and me) clean up the sides if it spills though. It's a good conductor yes, and might be a very good conductor of electricity too so much spills might end up shorting your MoBo. Dunno if that's true though, keep forgetting muh multitester when we clean Margaretha.

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That's 30C difference! I'm pretty sure cleaning the 3-year old dust that accumulated in the heat sinks helped, too! I also just cleaned my heatsinks and changed thermal paste on my cpu and gpu yesterday, as well. But sadly, GPU is already dead. I've done all I can to revive it.

 

KcmlNGY.jpg

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Beta Tester
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The magic of actually using quality thermal paste, instead of the default OEM paste that laptop manufacturers use.

 

for some manufacturers though, I think changing the paste can actually lead to worse performance

 

I remember reading a thread on them -chans about how performance declined after OP changed a Razer Blade's paste with something else

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Super Tester
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That's 30C difference! I'm pretty sure cleaning the 3-year old dust that accumulated in the heat sinks helped, too! I also just cleaned my heatsinks and changed thermal paste on my cpu and gpu yesterday, as well. But sadly, GPU is already dead. I've done all I can to revive it.

 

That looks like a PCI-E slot, if I'm not mistaken. Are you able to get a replacement graphics card from the manufacturer? If you can replace the damaged GPU, it'd be much cheaper than buying a completely new laptop altogether.

 

Try calling your local representative, and see if you can have the parts mailed to you. Generally manufacturers don't sell you parts unless you're an authorised repairer, though.

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That looks like a PCI-E slot, if I'm not mistaken. Are you able to get a replacement graphics card from the manufacturer? If you can replace the damaged GPU, it'd be much cheaper than buying a completely new laptop altogether.

 

Try calling your local representative, and see if you can have the parts mailed to you. Generally manufacturers don't sell you parts unless you're an authorised repairer, though.

 

I'm not sure if MSI still sells GTX 570m. I also found one on ebay and it costs around $300 dollars (not brand new). With that, I am planning to take the external GPU route - PCI.E to laptop mini-PCI.e and pop an EVGA 750 Ti on it. Cost just as much as a new GTX 570M but more powerful.

 

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That looks like a PCI-E slot, if I'm not mistaken. Are you able to get a replacement graphics card from the manufacturer? If you can replace the damaged GPU, it'd be much cheaper than buying a completely new laptop altogether.

 

Try calling your local representative, and see if you can have the parts mailed to you. Generally manufacturers don't sell you parts unless you're an authorised repairer, though.

 

Hey I need some help, I was at the step where you disconnect the cables that connect the keyboard to the laptop and the plastic housing for the small white cable broke off..What do I do? The two cables that are right next to each other (the white one and the black one) Not the main ribbon or any of the other ones... Need help because I cant seem to get it back in without the black plastic housing

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Super Tester
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Hey I need some help, I was at the step where you disconnect the cables that connect the keyboard to the laptop and the plastic housing for the small white cable broke off..What do I do? The two cables that are right next to each other (the white one and the black one) Not the main ribbon or any of the other ones... Need help because I cant seem to get it back in without the black plastic housing

 

Sorry for the late reply.

 

Are you referring to the small piece of plastic which snaps into place and keeps the keyboard cable ribbon pushed down and fixed into the connection area on the motherboard? Yes, that small piece is quite fragile, and it fell off for me too at one stage.

 

Do you have a pair of tweezers? I managed to fix it, but it was quite tedious and you need a very steady hand. You see the small notches on the left and right sides of where the cable ribbon goes into the motherboard? You'll need to fit the extended edges of the small plastic piece into those notches, however at the same time you also need to ensure that the copper(?) contacts on the motherboard are also held down properly, and fit into the small slitted gaps on the plastic piece.

 

Hold the plastic piece using a pair of tweezers so that if you hold it upright, you can see through the tiny slits. Carefully weave the copper(?) endings on the motherboard through the slits, and once you are sure that all of the endings are positioned correctly, tilt the plastic so that it can be fitted into the two notches, and firmly push down onto the motherboard until it clicks in.

 

Once you've re-attached the piece, you can make sure that it's done correctly by flapping the piece up and down; it should move smoothly when you flutter it open and shut like a door hinge, without feeling any "bumps".

Edited by benlisquare

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benlisquare,

 

I created an account here just to ask you a question since i am having the same heating problems in different games. 

 

I see that you cleaned off ALL of the old thermal paste but when repasting did you reapply paste to any of those other components that had old paste on it?

 

Thank you for making this post btw so very useful

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benlisquare,

 

I created an account here just to ask you a question since i am having the same heating problems in different games. 

 

I see that you cleaned off ALL of the old thermal paste but when repasting did you reapply paste to any of those other components that had old paste on it?

 

Thank you for making this post btw so very useful

 

If I understand your question - if the component had Paste on before and was in physical contact with the Heatsink - it should have paste on afterwards.

 

All the old crusty Thermal Paste MUST be cleaned off before re-applying new Paste (otherwsie it is a waste)

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