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Beta Tester
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British Battleship

Dreadnought

 

27wyj60.jpg

bask at her glory!

 

Specifications:

Type: Dreadnought Battleship

Displacement: 18410 tons
Length: 160.6 meters

Breadth: 25 meters

No of shafts: 4

Engine: 18 Babcock & Wilcox Boilers

Power: 23000 h.p.

Top speed: 21 knots (39 km/h)

 

Armament:

5 - Twin BL 12 inch Mark X Guns
Whooping 27 - Single 12 Pounder 18 CWT Mark I Guns
5 - 18-inch Torpedo Tubes


Armour:

Belt: 102 - 279 mm

Bulkheads: 203 mm

Barrettes: 102 - 279 mm

Turrets: 76 - 305 mm

Deck:19 - 76 mm

Conning tower: 279 mm

Torpedo room: 152 mm

 

Info:

 Our dear Dreadnought here was ordered in 1905 and laid down on 2nd October 1905. She's then launched on 10th February 1906 and finally commissioned on 2nd December 1906 at HM Dockyard at Portsmouth. Many said that her design has revolutionized naval technology and started the whole new generation of the Dreadnought type ships, HMS Dreadnought being the first. Due to her technological breakthrough, it creates an arms race between big nations where they also build Dreadnought-like ships but bigger, making the Dreadnought obsolete rather quickly.

 

 Her participation in the First World War wasn't as grand as her technological breakthrough. She served as the flagship of the Royal Navy's Home Fleet from 1907 to 1911 only to be replaced by HMS Neptune on March 1911. Due to that, she's transferred to the Home Fleet's 1st Division. She's then later became the flagship of the 4th Battle Squadron on December 1912 and spent the rest of the time training at the Mediterranean Sea til December 1913. She then once again replaced by HMS Benbow from her position as flagship of 4th Battle Squadron on 10 December 1914.

 

On 18 March 1915, HMS Dreadnought had did something unusual yet jaw dropping. She destroyed a German U-boat, SM U-29, by ramming it into two and becoming the first and only battleship to sink a submarine in history.

 

Between 18th April to 22nd June 1916, Dreadnought was getting refitted and due to that, she missed the Battle of Jutland on 31th May. So... yea. She then became the flagship of the 3rd Battle Squadron on 9th July where she and her fleet defends Sheerness from the German battle-cruiser bombardment.

 

 Dreadnought was refitted once more and resumed her role as flagship of the 4th Battle Squadron on March 1918. She later then put into reserve at Rosyth in February 1919. Dreadnought was put up for sale on 31 March 1920 and sold for scrap to T.W. Ward & Company on 9 May 1921 for the sum of £44,000. She was broken up at Ward's new premises at Inverkeithing, Scotland, upon arrival on 2 January 1923 where she was scrapped.

 

Fate:
Scrapped

2 January 1923

 

After reading back, I can already sense that there are tons of mistakes that I might not noticed. So dear historians and warships experts, do tell if there's any inaccuracy or something to add or point out. Don't want to spread the wrong info in the historical section now, would we?

Edited by Subete_Yoi

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Moderator
4,163 posts
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To expand - prior battleships usually featured a mixed battery armament - consisting of guns of different sizes. The intention was for them to be able to fight at all ranges, with ships first firing with a small number of long range, large calibre guns, then closing in for their huge number of slightly smaller calibre guns to fight and finish off each other.

 

However, British analysis of the Battle of Tsushima concluded that most of the damage caused by ships on either side came from their large-calibre armament alone, and its effectiveness was shown by the sinking of the Russian battleships by long range gunfire - the first time modern, steel construction warships were sunk like that.

 

Therefore, the British Admiralty pushed for the experimental design of a battleship armed solely with a uniform, large-calibre primary battery. This design was the H.M.S. Dreadnought. So long as a battleship only carried large-calibre guns and restricted its secondary armaments for light weapons for close defence against torpedo boats, it would always outgun a battleship carrying a mixed battery and would be capable of heavy, destructive gunfire from longer ranges. Broadside to broadside, Dreadnought could fire six 12" guns at her target. At that range, most pre-dreadnought designs would only be able to reply with two to four at most.

 

When Dreadnought was launched, all other battleship designs became obsolete and every other nation had to build dreadnought-pattern battleships or risk having their ships be inferior to the uniform battery design. Given the arms race that subsequently occurred, Dreadnought became obsolete herself rather quickly as nations designed bigger, better and more heavily armed dreadnought-pattern battleships.

 

As an aside, £44,000 in 1920 is a lot of money. I don't know the exact value, but it's equivalent to well over a million pounds by today's standards.

Edited by Syanda

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Beta Tester
98 posts
67 battles

When Dreadnought was launched, all other battleship designs became obsolete and every other nation had to build dreadnought-pattern battleships or risk having their ships be inferior to the uniform battery design. Given the arms race that subsequently occurred, Dreadnought became obsolete herself rather quickly as nations designed bigger, better and more heavily armed dreadnought-pattern battleships.

Indeed... big nations wants to be the best. Everytime one builds something big, others build it bigger and bigger and so on, so forth.

 

True that £44000 might means quite a lot back in the days... Just cant help to see the number being not so significant...

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Super Tester
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but still, this thing was the progenitor of all things dread and superdread. wish they had saved the thing as a testament to a ground in shipbuilding since Mikasa is currently the only pre-dread battleship 'alive'

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Beta Tester
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At this rate I can't wait for a battle between the HMS Dreadnought, the German Nassau, Japanese Kawachi and American South Carolina Class - All first dreadnoughts of their respective nations :)

 

Not sure on the Gangut however for the Russian Navy - for the first Russian Dreadnought she had a long career that spanned well into World War 2 and she has 12 guns, might be OP for a starter ship on the Russian BB line if WG can find enough blueprints

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Member
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At this rate I can't wait for a battle between the HMS Dreadnought, the German Nassau, Japanese Kawachi and American South Carolina Class - All first dreadnoughts of their respective nations :)

 

Not sure on the Gangut however for the Russian Navy - for the first Russian Dreadnought she had a long career that spanned well into World War 2 and she has 12 guns, might be OP for a starter ship on the Russian BB line if WG can find enough blueprints

You'd have the same problem with the Italian dreadnought Dante Alighieri. In fact they look very much alike.

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Alpha Tester
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Tier 3 or tier 4 would be fit, the First Dreadnought and uh..

i don't think WG will implement  Submerged Torpedoes for her, like Warspite

Edited by Harpoon01

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Member
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To expand - prior battleships usually featured a mixed battery armament - consisting of guns of different sizes. The intention was for them to be able to fight at all ranges, with ships first firing with a small number of long range, large calibre guns, then closing in for their huge number of slightly smaller calibre guns to fight and finish off each other.

 

However, British analysis of the Battle of Tsushima concluded that most of the damage caused by ships on either side came from their large-calibre armament alone, and its effectiveness was shown by the sinking of the Russian battleships by long range gunfire - the first time modern, steel construction warships were sunk like that.

 

Therefore, the British Admiralty pushed for the experimental design of a battleship armed solely with a uniform, large-calibre primary battery. This design was the H.M.S. Dreadnought. So long as a battleship only carried large-calibre guns and restricted its secondary armaments for light weapons for close defence against torpedo boats, it would always outgun a battleship carrying a mixed battery and would be capable of heavy, destructive gunfire from longer ranges. Broadside to broadside, Dreadnought could fire six 12" guns at her target. At that range, most pre-dreadnought designs would only be able to reply with two to four at most.

 

When Dreadnought was launched, all other battleship designs became obsolete and every other nation had to build dreadnought-pattern battleships or risk having their ships be inferior to the uniform battery design. Given the arms race that subsequently occurred, Dreadnought became obsolete herself rather quickly as nations designed bigger, better and more heavily armed dreadnought-pattern battleships.

 

As an aside, £44,000 in 1920 is a lot of money. I don't know the exact value, but it's equivalent to well over a million pounds by today's standards.

 

Actually from looking at the proffile drawing here, it looks like she could put x8 12" guns on target in almost any direction front to sides which is actually kinda impressive.The following Bellerophon class being a very similar ship with the same armament layout as well.

800px-HMS_Dreadnought_%281911%29_profile

Edited by Ouroboros85

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Beta Tester
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scrapping value is always very low compared to build value, somewhere around 1/10th if not lower.

 

At this rate I can't wait for a battle between the HMS Dreadnought, the German Nassau, Japanese Kawachi and American South Carolina Class - All first dreadnoughts of their respective nations :)

 

Not sure on the Gangut however for the Russian Navy - for the first Russian Dreadnought she had a long career that spanned well into World War 2 and she has 12 guns, might be OP for a starter ship on the Russian BB line if WG can find enough blueprints

 

Gangut is a 2nd generation "dreadnought", i.e. designed post the launch of South Carolina, Dreadnought and Nassau.

I guess Gangut could be the same Tier as these ships but historically her stats put her a half or full tier above :/

 

Tee

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[WORLD]
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This is kind of a history/naval architecture question. What are those diagonal dealies running down the length of HMS Dreadnoughts hull? Bellerophon's in game model has them too.

Edited by Yaleling
Fixing the worst typos

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[WORLD]
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Thanks BigWaveSurfer. :D
I knew they had to have a practical use, but it was too hard to google "diagonal metal dealies on Dreadnought"

 

torpedo nets.jpg

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[CLAY]
Alpha Tester
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Another side affect of the all 'big guns' I have heard over the years is it made the lives of the range finders much easier. Let face it 10in splash on the water looks no different to 12in splash. :cap_look:

Edited by BigWaveSurfer

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