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blauflamme22

Blau's aviation corner

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193
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395 posts
8,245 battles

So, after a previous thread got hijacked (7500 transponder code) from I cant remember what to a discussion about aviation, aerial spotting and cloud types, I though I should come up with an aviation based thread, since it has been an important component in naval warfare for essentially 100 years now. Feel free to post here interesting stories about naval aviation, ask aviation related questions (some of us are pilots, ATC, aviation engineers etc who can answer you) and, (I'm taking a big risk here) suggestions regarding aviation in the game. I say suggestions because this isn't a place to have an anti CV rant in, if you don't like the current CV gameplay don't just come here and whinge, instead how about offering up some constructive suggestions and reasoned arguments on said suggestions. Because I like talking to myself in these threads I'll post a little something to get things started.

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193
[AN-DO]
Member
395 posts
8,245 battles

So, I'd like to write briefly about an old neighbour of mine, because I think he typifies the character of an aviator in the second World War. He was a New Zealander who fought in an article XV squadron for RAF coastal command, flying Beaufighters in an anti-shipping role, this involved long patrol flights out over the north sea. something taxing on boat the pilot and navigator. He is credited with a probable ME109 kill (no easy feat for a beaufighter in the daytime) and the destruction of a German armed trawler for which he received the distinguished flying medal. The heavy damage from the trawlers AA (those things carried a lot of guns) resulted in heavy damage forcing a return to base on one engine and a belly landing. It wasn't the only damage he would receive. He was also shot down over the Atlantic and spent three days at sea in a life-raft. Reading his logbook the entries for these events and summaries are amusing, when listing the aircraft types flown in the previous month he simply listed "Beaufighter" and "Dinghy." He would continue to have success damaging and sinking German shipping for the remainder of the war. His log books show that status reports during training were of "adequate performance" nothing special, yet when it came to real combat, like so many others he rose to the challenge and went above and beyond what was expected, often risking not just aircraft but his life. After the war he never flew again. instead becoming a jeweller. Humble, quiet but dedicated and persevering. Even when he had cancer in his 80's, he would ride his old pushbike, rain or shine, up to the hospital for his chemotherapy and back, never complaining, just getting on with it. That is true character, and why I'm proud to just have known such a person.

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