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  1. So your having ping problems? I’ve often heard people complain about having PING issues when talking about connecting to World of Warships / World of Tanks. This guide will hopefully give you a little insight as to how the internet works, where things can go wrong and who at the end of the day is responsible for either its repair or resolution. So to start with, we need to have a start point, we are going to use a program called ping plotter and the target address is going to be: login.worldofwarships.jp Once you’ve entered the above address in to ping plotter, you will see something not to dissimilar to the following. The following is through Adam Internet which uses iiNet’s Australian Infrastructure Target Name: login.worldofwarships.jp IP: xx.xx.xx.xx Date/Time: 8/01/2016 11:23:50 AM to 8/01/2016 11:24:27 AM Hop Sent Err PL% Min Max Avg Host Name / [iP] 1 16 0 0.0 1 17 3 [xx.xx.xx.xx] 2 15 11 73.3 16 20 17 lns21.adl6.on.ii.net [xx.xx.xx.xx] 3 15 11 73.3 18 22 20 te0-2-0.cr1.adl2.on.ii.net [203.16.212.24] 4 15 11 73.3 38 62 49 ae16.br1.syd4.on.ii.net [150.101.33.188] 5 15 11 73.3 136 138 136 te0-0-0.bdr2.nrt1.on.ii.net [203.16.211.58] 6 15 11 73.3 135 146 139 as7473.ix.jpix.ad.jp [210.171.224.126] 7 15 11 73.3 137 144 139 [203.208.166.206] 8 15 11 73.3 204 229 211 [203.208.166.174] 9 15 11 73.3 204 214 209 [203.208.171.202] 10 15 11 73.3 151 170 158 [203.208.175.74] 11 15 11 73.3 151 155 152 sg2-n5596-fe-1-vl231.fe.core.pw [92.223.116.163] 12 15 11 73.3 152 157 155 login.worldofwarships.jp [92.223.28.75] Ping statistics for login.worldofwarships.jp Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0.0%) Round Trip Times: Minimum = 105ms, Maximum = 165ms, Average = 131ms The following is through Vodaphone’s Australian Mobile Network Target Name: login.worldofwarships.jp IP: 92.223.28.60 Date/Time: 8/01/2016 11:25:53 AM 1 0 ms 0 ms 0 ms 6 ms 0 ms [xx.xx.xx.xx] 2 * * * N/A N/A [-] 3 24 ms 38 ms 31 ms 40 ms 25 ms [10.247.69.177] 4 32 ms 28 ms 21 ms 32 ms 36 ms [10.143.159.163] 5 22 ms 18 ms 31 ms 18 ms 25 ms [10.246.238.195] 6 35 ms 29 ms 20 ms 30 ms N/A [220.101.66.45] 7 * * * N/A N/A [-] 8 * * * N/A N/A [-] 9 * * * N/A N/A [-] 10 * * * N/A N/A [-] 11 51 ms 68 ms 59 ms 67 ms N/A [59.154.18.122] 12 111 ms 105 ms 97 ms 106 ms N/A [203.208.177.121] 13 98 ms 132 ms 108 ms 113 ms N/A [203.208.158.29] 14 109 ms 107 ms 98 ms 104 ms N/A [203.208.175.74] 15 120 ms 117 ms 116 ms 118 ms N/A sg2-n5596-fe-1-vl231.fe.core.pw [92.223.116.163] 16 111 ms 109 ms 163 ms 228 ms 115 ms login.worldofwarships.jp [92.223.28.60] Ping statistics for login.worldofwarships.jp Packets: Sent = 5, Received = 5, Lost = 0 (0.0%) Round Trip Times: Minimum = 109ms, Maximum = 228ms, Average = 145ms So now you’ve got this information, what does it mean? This information shows each step and the time it takes in milliseconds to reach the following next hop until it eventually reaches the target destination. This information gives some indication as to what is happening on the network and where and who it belongs to, but please be aware that MOST internet providers use a system called mpls. Why does MPLS matter? MPLS is an adaptive environment, it will always route to the fastest path available and in the advent of a path becoming physically damaged or over utilised it will seek out the next best path. For more information, look here - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiprotocol_Label_Switching / http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/support/docs/multiprotocol-label-switching-mpls/mpls/4649-mpls-faq-4649.html Decoding the above information The IP address is your current IP address, in this instance we’ve blanked it out with xx.xx.xx.xx, then we get a date and time, followed by the first hop. 1 16 0 0.0 1 17 3 [xx.xx.xx.xx] (This is to your local router) If the number is high here, you’ve got a couple of local network problems, generally poor wifi performance, interference on either a wired network cable or a wireless card or simple over utilisation of the link. (Not something wargaming can resolve) 2 15 11 73.3 16 20 17 lns21.adl6.on.ii.net [xx.xx.xx.xx] This next step is the local area’s network switch / dslam / or exchange, other terminologies are used depending on what technology you are on. A problem here indicates a local issue to your service area. (Not something wargaming can resolve) 3 15 11 73.3 18 22 20 te0-2-0.cr1.adl2.on.ii.net [203.16.212.24] This next step in this example is my cities Internet Controller, I can see that it’s adl (Adelaide) and I know that a problem here would more than likely affect everyone connected to this core switch. Now most ISP’s will have multiple devices in their communications rack and sometimes someone with the same ISP will not have the same issue. But a problem here means calling your ISP and providing these logs. (Not something wargaming can resolve) 4 15 11 73.3 38 62 49 ae16.br1.syd4.on.ii.net [150.101.33.188] This step In my example shows where after Adelaide it goes, so from the previous hop which was Adelaide, my ISP is routing me through to Sydney. Any issue here is still in control of iinet / adam but would more than likely affecting the entire country for anyone on iiNet / Adam and possibly other ISP’s who pay for bandwidth on their infrastructure. (Not something wargaming can resolve) From here we go in to International Cable Network Space and things get a little tricky 5 15 11 73.3 136 138 136 te0-0-0.bdr2.nrt1.on.ii.net [203.16.211.58] Our first step in this example where our information is leaving Australia, in this example we’ve gone through the AJC cable system and ended up in Japan, Chiba Region, Narita. This is an international landing point for the AJC system. Any issue between Australia and here is usually a cable system problem, and is handled by Tier 1 Carriers and Resolution teams. (Not something wargaming can resolve) 6 15 11 73.3 135 146 139 as7473.ix.jpix.ad.jp [210.171.224.126] Now this step is an interesting one, this is where it leaves the AJC router and now connects to the Japanese Exchange Co Carrier, from here it get routed to the next hop, and gets picked up by Singtel (Not something wargaming can resolve) 7 15 11 73.3 137 144 139 [203.208.166.206] This next hop is no longer in Japan Controlled ISP space, it’s now firmly in the hands of Singtel and on a for the second time in this trip a major cable system (Sea Me Wee 3). Whilst this route is controlled by Signtel, there is a tier 1 carrier who owns and is responsible for Sea Me Wee 3, any problems here have to be reported to this t1 carrier, who then action and resolve. (Not something wargaming can resolve) 8 15 11 73.3 204 229 211 [203.208.166.174] Still with Singtel, going through more switches / Routes (Not something wargaming can resolve) 9 15 11 73.3 204 214 209 [203.208.171.202] Still with Singtel, going through more switches / Routes (Not something wargaming can resolve) 10 15 11 73.3 151 170 158 [203.208.175.74] Still with Singtel, but is now at the landing point in to Singapore(Not something wargaming can resolve) 11 15 11 73.3 151 155 152 sg2-n5596-fe-1-vl231.fe.core.pw [92.223.116.163] This marks the Core and the ISP that Singtel are using for this service, in this instance it’s with an ISP called G-Crore Labs. (Any internet issues Wargaming have are reported here, the ISP then troubleshoots and escalates) 12 15 11 73.3 152 157 155 login.worldofwarships.jp [92.223.28.75] And now we hit the actual wargaming login server…. Which is under the direct control of Wargaming. But Wargaming pay the ISP, so it’s Wargaming are responsible for providing a service. Yes and No, Wargaming can only purchase Bandwidth, who handles that digitial highway, what SLA’s, what Routes it takes is not up to the ISP. It’s up to Singtel and the Tier 1 carrier, additionally when there is a cable fault, traffic is routed to essential services and communications, and is decided upon by the tier 2 and tier 1 carriers. Ultimately if you are having ping issues, the chances are it’s either a local issue or a carrier issue, but this is written in the attempt to dispel the myth that Wargaming has control over the routes and how their traffic works. The only ways to improve your ping are choosing a better ISP with more options (E.g. Telstra) changing the technology of your internet, using a vpn or changing the location of where you live What do these cable paths look like? Well they look like this AJC Sourthern Cross And Sea Me Wee 3, 39,000 KM of cable
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